Author: Gerald

Study visit: Modigliani

I have always thought of Modigliani as the sort of artist that can get you into trouble. Remembering the raised eyebrows with which my tutors greeted my proposal that I write my first long essay as a student about the relationship between his sculptures and his nudes, I was half-expecting there to be a warning sign at the entrance of his exhibition at Tate Modern. Instead the visitor is met by four galleries of sensational portraits – not to mention a film about his life in Paris and a queue for a virtual tour of his studio – before being treated to even a glimpse of an ankle. Join Gerald on the 3 February.

21 talks and 24 days later

All perfectly logical, as it turned out, but it got me thinking about the links between the places that I was visiting and the talks that I was giving as well as about the idiosyncratic relationship that Australia seems to have with maps.

Reading Proust By Kindle

Last week I bumped into myself near Oxford Circus. Well, not me exactly but a slightly older and much cooler version of my teenage self: strap-hanging in the rush hour with one finger tucked into the first few pages of Proust and with his thumb in the Appendix.

Some like it hot, part ii

Marilyn’s capacity for self-caricature had always been an essential part of her role as an American icon. In her early photographs she appears upholstered and underwired like a cross between Mae West and the Statue of Liberty.

Some like it hot, part:i

The razzmatazz of celebrity endorsements that marked the last days of Hillary Clinton’s election campaign has led me to wonder this morning which performer Donald Trump will now appoint to sing at his inauguration in December. Whoever it is, their performance is unlikely to surpass Marilyn Monroe’s notoriously suggestive rendition of Happy Birthday, which she sang to her lover Jack Kennedy in 1962.

Georgia O’Keeffe

Georgia O’Keefe in New Mexico

About half-way through Georgia O’Keeffe’s exhibition at Tate Modern I began to wonder if, perhaps, the Tate ought to have promoted the show as a group exhibition since it included so much work by other artists…

Waiting for the Macaws

At the opening of the new extension to Tate Modern there was a small notice next to one of the exhibits. ‘Due to expected visitor numbers’, it read, ‘the macaws have temporarily been returned to their owners.’ Given the quality of the other works on show, it is unlikely that this caused much disappointment to visitors…

Sugar and spice

Last week I took a couple of days off to walk down the Thames from Windsor Castle to Hampton Court in order to visit the palaces. My excuse was that I had been working over the previous few weekends and that I wanted to brush up on my knowledge of Tudor and Stuart paintings while getting a bit of spring sunshine.

In search of a three-point plug?

What’s not to like about the exhibition, Electronic Superhighway, at the Whitechapel Gallery? Despite the slight frustration of finding that this survey from 1966 – 2016 is laid out in reverse, this is the most impressive exhibition about art and new technology in years.

What lies beneath

Having moved to London a year ago, I am still revelling in the opportunity to compare and contrast a huge number of exhibitions that are available in the capital. For example, last weekend I accompanied an OCA group on a study day to the Hoyland exhibition at the Damien Hirst Gallery and the Auerbach at Tate Britain. This week I was reminded of our visit when I was looking at one of the permanent displays, Making Traces, at Tate Modern.