Category: Music

rarescale summer school – a level 1 student’s experience

On a warm July morning, twenty one musicians descended on Harlaxton manor for five days of flute playing and composing at the annual rarescale summer school. An eclectic bunch, the flautists ranged from talented amateurs to music college graduates embarking on performing careers, and the composition group consisted of undergraduate music students and early career composers.

Sue Greenfield

For any students interested in Street Photography or how to make a concise, well-paced and well-structured presentation – take a look at Sue Greenfield’s video for her 5th Assignment for Gesture and Meaning.

Reflection and the edit: Part 2

You may be familiar with the idea of writing a first draft of an essay, and then editing it down to get to the final version? In my view, to edit a body of work is something that needs to be done continuously and not done just at the end, through reflecting on what ideas/techniques are working and what isn’t and making the decision to either take them forwards or ‘edit’ them out and leave them behind. Editing your work ensures that ideas are always pushed forwards and projects aren’t left to become stagnant and uninspire.

21 talks and 24 days later

All perfectly logical, as it turned out, but it got me thinking about the links between the places that I was visiting and the talks that I was giving as well as about the idiosyncratic relationship that Australia seems to have with maps.

Composer/Performer or Performer/Composer?

I have, probably since the age of 14 or so, identified myself as a composer. I played piano (and also guitar and flute rather unsuccessfully), and have variously performed as a classical pianist, accompanist, duo partner, cocktail pianist, jazz pianist, and even a keyboardist in a rock band, yet because I studied composition at music college, and I now lecture in composition, I never really identified as being a performer.

Student study event news

Following a review earlier this year it was agreed the funds provided to OCASA would be substantially increased to encourage both a wider distribution of funds to students and to encourage a diversification in the types of activities available to students.

In conversation with: Rob Bentall

“I think piece titles are very important! A piece should drape naturally from its title, in the same way a coat hangs off a peg. I often find the music suggests a title, which certainly happened in Summer Anthem, with the title drawing upon the generic association of dance music with the summer season and of this genre with club ‘anthems’, this term often indicating a big hook.”

Reflection and the edit: Part 1

Reflecting on your work underpins your entire practice; it is essential to be able to look objectively at your work and really review things such as- why you have done something, how does it work, is it a success or does it require more development/thought, how would it be improved, and the specifics of why it has worked/not worked.

Getting the most from sibelius: Part 2

In the first blog I covered the fundamentals: what you need to include in a score and how to make it look clear and easily readable. In this second post I will explore the presentation of more complicated music, including larger ensembles and more complex rhythmic notation.