Browsing Category Study tips

Reflection and the edit: Part 2

You may be familiar with the idea of writing a first draft of an essay, and then editing it down to get to the final version? In my view, to edit a body of work is something that needs to be done continuously and not done just at the end, through reflecting on what ideas/techniques are working and what isn’t and making the decision to either take them forwards or ‘edit’ them out and leave them behind. Editing your work ensures that ideas are always pushed forwards and projects aren’t left to become stagnant and uninspire.

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Reflection and the edit: Part 1

Reflecting on your work underpins your entire practice; it is essential to be able to look objectively at your work and really review things such as- why you have done something, how does it work, is it a success or does it require more development/thought, how would it be improved, and the specifics of why it has worked/not worked.

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To cite, or not to cite…

That is the question…. of plagiarism!
One of the issues that crops up repeatedly around assessment time is referencing academic writing. What do I reference? How do I reference? How do I know if it needs referencing? – all these are perfectly valid questions and frequent concerns.

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Getting the most out of your learning log

One of the key components in developing your learning log or blog is visual analysis – looking at, selecting and recording the artists/photographers who you find interesting, challenging or useful in progressing your work. The more you document and reflect upon those creative practitioners who have had a ‘marmite effect’ on you, the more you will improve both your critical thinking and creative skills.

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Compare and contrast

In the responses to the post I wrote about in praise of permanent collections it became clear that writing about art is sometimes an issue for students, especially if confronted with complex or difficult works. A better technique is to move towards a consideration of two works rather than one. By looking for similarity and difference between two works, each can reveal something of the other.

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