Category: Subject

Study visit: Modigliani

I have always thought of Modigliani as the sort of artist that can get you into trouble. Remembering the raised eyebrows with which my tutors greeted my proposal that I write my first long essay as a student about the relationship between his sculptures and his nudes, I was half-expecting there to be a warning sign at the entrance of his exhibition at Tate Modern. Instead the visitor is met by four galleries of sensational portraits – not to mention a film about his life in Paris and a queue for a virtual tour of his studio – before being treated to even a glimpse of an ankle. Join Gerald on the 3 February.

Today’s British cinema and history

The rest of the world may love our costume dramas and imagine that England still thinks it rules the waves – about that delusion I think they are right – yet I am filled with gloom that cinema continues to churn out this stuff.

Don’t be frozen, let your work go and get published!

Through my writers’ group, I’ve met far too many talented writers who are frozen with fear when it comes to submitting their work for publication. I can understand why; I went through it myself. For years I would whip up tsunami-sized excuses as to why my work wasn’t good enough to be inflicted on others. Then something happened: I finally let go of my fears and insecurities, and my work found its way into the inbox of a publisher.

Getting the most from Sibelius: Part 4

The first three posts covered the basics of the programme through to working with large, complicated scores. I’m going to continue the series with several posts dealing with advanced techniques and non-standard notation. This post deals with issues of spacing in complex scores.

Looking at artists: Paper

I usually start working with paper as a medium for drawing and painting, to create collages, folding it to make 3D models… We may live in a digital world, but for creatives using paper has by no means diminished. Folded into origami and kirigami, laser-cut, layered and made into sculptures, artists can transform a humble sheet of old tree into a spectacular artwork.