Posts tagged fine art

Student work: Accidental lessons – sourced through higher learning

Through my BA, I have personally observed how within art, the physical act of creating, we can find our own version of OK. This was not something I set out to discover or had any prior inkling of; yet it is a topic I now feel so strongly about, that it has become deeply embedded within my practice.

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OCA collaboration project 2019

Are you interested in the potential for creative disciplines to come together in exciting new ways?  Have you ever considered using sound or music in your work, or perhaps created visual pieces that resonate with music in some way? Or perhaps you are a composer, who has thought about how your compositions might be informed and extended through other approaches.

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Study event review: Halifax OCA-North Meeting

Our group comprised textiles, painting/drawing and photography students at all three levels. This, in itself, was an important factor contributing to open and critical discussion. Added to this was Rebecca’s excellent talk on her own practice and formation as an artist and tutor. Following this she led a discussion on work that several of us had brought along.

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Produce, Re-use, Recycle…

In 2005 an 8 year old girl was told by a security guard to stop sketching Picasso and Matisse paintings as ‘they’re copyrighted’ (Jardin 2005). So what is a copy and how much new, creative work is required to term the work as ‘influenced by’, or an ‘homage’?  Is her version in a different medium a copy?

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Some thoughts on criticality

Critical Art can be hard to understand – it’s designed to be challenging after all – but the bracing experience of having one’s expectations re-calibrated so that we can understand everything anew, or at least from a different point of view is to be encouraged.

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Using traditional textiles today

Often when thinking about textiles utility comes to mind. This connotation is largely attributed the medium’s rich history across a variety of cultures, from decorative medieval unicorn tapestries woven from wool and silk thread; to the Kente fabrics of 17th century Ashanti weavers today in Ghana; to Peruvian woven rugs and tapestries of the Quechua tradition. An integral part of community and daily life, textile fabrication has provided people with shelter, costuming, decoration, protection comfort… and has also been used to document and express narrative.

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