Posts tagged Textiles

Textile and Place Conference at Manchester Metropolitan University

As an educator it is always delightful to sit back and absorb the ideas and knowledge of others. A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of attending the Textile and Place Conference co organised by Manchester School of Art and the Whitworth Gallery. It proved to be two days of textile nourishment spending time with other textile types.

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Presenting student work: Ruth Venables yarn collection for A Textiles Vocabulary

What makes this particular student’s yarns so exciting is that she has clearly been inspired and demonstrates so well that she has been stimulated by her source material. Whether this is her secondary research in the form of a medieval artwork or her primary research in the colour studies of glass vessels, there are clear links and reference points between her work and its creative source.

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Textiles without textiles

Art students often label themselves according to the name of the course that they are studying; They become a ‘fine artist’, ‘photographer’ or ‘textile designer’. That’s okay but we are all adaptable creative thinkers and labels can be restrictive. I encourage students to look at other disciplines to inspire their own; to mix craft skill with wild ideas and to challenge processes by applying mindsets from other creative genres.

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Looking at the future of textiles: Science and technology

Many Artists and designers use more unconventional techniques and unusual methods, usually from other fields to create their collections. Sometimes using materials or processes that are technology/science led bring very interesting outcomes and new ways of working that can open new doors for the future of Arts and Design.

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Looking at artists: Paper

I usually start working with paper as a medium for drawing and painting, to create collages, folding it to make 3D models… We may live in a digital world, but for creatives using paper has by no means diminished. Folded into origami and kirigami, laser-cut, layered and made into sculptures, artists can transform a humble sheet of old tree into a spectacular artwork.

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